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2 Peter 3:8-10

But you must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent. But the day of the Lord will come as unexpectedly as a thief. Then the heavens will pass away with a terrible noise, and the very elements themselves will disappear in fire, and the earth and everything on it will be found to deserve judgment.
2 Peter 3:8-10

Dear God, if Peter were here today would he still express these sentiments with the same words? Now that it’s been nearly 2,000 years since the Crucifixion, would he rethink his understanding of Jesus’s return? I mean, I’ll admit that I don’t understand anything about this. Now, I also don’t feel like I have to understand it to be completely devoted to you and worship you. Going back to my thing about you keeping me on a need-to-know basis and I don’t need to know. But what would Peter and Paul think about the fact that the second coming has apparently not happened yet?

I have to admit, when I read verse 10 I think about the fallout of nuclear war. Humans have now set up the possibility of the heavens passing away with a terrible noise and the very elements themselves disappearing in fire. We could do that ourselves. Is that possibly part of this prophecy? Will that happen? Is that part of Jesus returning?

Father, I’m literally not afraid of any of this (well, mostly not afraid). I’m am here to worship you. I repent of the sins of which I am aware and ask your mercy over the sins of which I’m not aware. I will work as into you today. Holy Spirit, walk with me today. Speak to me and give me ears to hear. Give me eyes to see. Give me compassion and love. Help me to love others and extend grace beyond my own capacity. Then, “when my body lies in the ruins of the lies that nearly ruined me will you pick up the pieces that were pure and true and breathe new life into them and set them free? When you blast this cosmos to kingdom come…when those jagged-edged mountains I live are gone…when the sky is crossed with the tears of a thousand falling suns as they crash into the sea, then can I be with you? Can I be with you?” (“Be With You” by Rich Mullins)

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2022 in 2 Peter

 

2 Peter 3:8-10

But you must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent. But the day of the Lord will come as unexpectedly as a thief. Then the heavens will pass away with a terrible noise, and the very elements themselves will disappear in fire, and the earth and everything on it will be found to deserve judgment.
2 Peter 3:8-10

Dear God, I was talking with my wife recently about Christians’ conflicted relationship with the end times. On the one hand we say, “Come on back Jesus.” On the other hand we see something that we interpret as a sign of the tribulation or whatever and we freak out. For example, if we see someone we perceive to be the anti-Christ, shouldn’t that excite us? Doesn’t that mean you’re getting closer?

It came up because she told me she had talked earlier that day with a friend who was freaked out by the recent lunar eclipse. It was the biggest one or whatever for 600 years and it will be another 600 years before it will repeat. So why does that thought cause fear and trepidation in the hearts of the faithful?

My theory is that we aren’t scared that we are losing our window to evangelize or make a difference. What is at stake is our comfort. Tell a slave or a suffering person that the end is near and they will be grateful. Tell a comfortable, fat and happy American Christian the end is near and there is resistance. There is fear of the unknown.

Father, the best thing I know to do with all of this is to take my eyes off of it and put them on you. I can’t get caught up in the future because it distracts me from this moment. Show me what you want me to do in this moment. Show me the work you have for me to do today. And help me to be what you need me to be for your kingdom so that it might come and you will might be done on earth as it is in heaven.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on November 30, 2021 in 2 Peter

 

2 Peter 3:3-10

Most importantly, I want to remind you that in the last days scoffers will come, mocking the truth and following their own desires. They will say, “What happened to the promise that Jesus is coming again? From before the times of our ancestors, everything has remained the same since the world was first created.” They deliberately forget that God made the heavens long ago by the word of his command, and he brought the earth out from the water and surrounded it with water. Then he used the water to destroy the ancient world with a mighty flood. And by the same word, the present heavens and earth have been stored up for fire. They are being kept for the day of judgment, when ungodly people will be destroyed. But you must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent. But the day of the Lord will come as unexpectedly as a thief. Then the heavens will pass away with a terrible noise, and the very elements themselves will disappear in fire, and the earth and everything on it will be found to deserve judgment.
2 Peter 3:3-10

Dear God, some Christians are uncomfortable with this passage because they don’t want to deal with the idea that Peter didn’t understand the second coming. If scripture is inerrant, then how do I deal with Peter’s errancy? But in this case, I don’t know that Peter was wrong as much as he was sharing his theory. Now, he would probably have been shocked to learn that I would still be sitting here 2,000 years later still waiting for your return. But there’s something comforting in Peter’s mistakes.

For me, Peter is the living embodiment of what you value. He allows his passion and love for you to both lurch the church forward into history and then to get him into trouble or the wrong situations. For example, just before Pentecost, he seemingly abruptly decides that it’s up to them to fulfill the prophecy and replace Judas, which they do by casting lots and picking Matthias. But history tells us it was likely actually Paul who fulfilled that prophecy. Then he went on to deliver an amazing prayer at Pentecost. I could go on and on with stories about him. My point is, he lived a little recklessly, but sometimes that’s what you need, even if it comes with some hubristic or foolish mistakes.

Father, I am not a reckless person. I am not a bold person. I don’t know if you necessarily want me to be given the role you have for me in your body. Whether I am or I’m not intended to be more like Peter, please help me to not judge the Peters in your body so harshly, but to do what I can to support them. And help me to live completely into the role you have for me to play.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2021 in 2 Peter

 

2 Peter 3:8-13

But you must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent. But the day of the Lord will come as unexpectedly as a thief. Then the heavens will pass away with a terrible noise, and the very elements themselves will disappear in fire, and the earth and everything on it will be found to deserve judgment. Since everything around us is going to be destroyed like this, what holy and godly lives you should live, looking forward to the day of God and hurrying it along. On that day, he will set the heavens on fire, and the elements will melt away in the flames. But we are looking forward to the new heavens and new earth he has promised, a world filled with God’s righteousness.

2 Peter 3:8-13

Dear God, I’ve always tried to not spend too much time thinking about the second coming, the afterlife, the rapture, the tribulation, and then the new kingdom. It seems like a distraction to me. It feels like something that takes my mind off of the present and being engaged in what you’ve called me to do today.

My wife and I just finished watching The Good Place. We normally wouldn’t have watched it, but a friend I trust recommended it. We saw the final episode last night and I was left a little…I don’t know how to describe it. It was just wrong. First and foremost, it was missing you. That was a problem. Second, it treated time like it will be experienced like we experience it now, and I don’t think that’s how it will be. You are timeless and I think that somehow we will become timeless as well. In fact, making us experience time forever seems like a form of hell. Third, and I guess finally for my purposes here tonight, it was all about earning your access to “the good place.” There was no sacrificial love. No mercy.

So how do I see my eternity after death? I see it as 1.) focused on you as God. Worshiping you. Praising you. Knowing you. 2.) I don’t think I will experience passage of time. I think time will be meaningless and there will just be existence in your realm. 3.) I know I will never get there on my own, but you’ve shown me too many times in this life how much you love me regardless of how good I am. I know your mercy is all that will get me there.

Father, help me to just plug away moment to moment. I know that I need to be ready, as Peter says here, but I’ll never be ready in the moment if I’m actually looking for the moment. I’ll only be ready if I am simply serving and following you in the present moment. Help me to stay focused on the present.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on November 30, 2020 in 2 Peter

 

2 Peter 3:8-9

But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.
2 Peter 3:8-9

Dear God, my wife and I were having dinner with friends last night and the conversation rolled around to some of the things in our lives that haven’t gone how we planned or wanted. For some of those things, we are still waiting for you to answer our prayers and do what we hope you will do.

I mentioned to them that I have just gotten to the point that I believe that you will bring about the things I hope you will. Bring about, but it has to be done n this way, taking this much time, because that is the way that will be best for your plan and the way that will best accomplish what I hope you will accomplish. There are times when I feel like my decision to believe this is a mental crutch to get through some of the disappointments and frustrations in my life. On the other hand, when I look back on my life, time and time again I can see that the things I wanted to happen that you brought about almost always required more time to come together than I wanted, but they also turned out better than I had expected because of it.

Father, for privacy reasons and since others see this journal I am not going to specifically say what I mean when I pray this, but I know you know what I’m talking about. So please do your work. Do it in your time. Do it in your way. Do it for your purposes and plan. And do it for your glory. Forget me. Forget my desires or my ego in this. I give it all to you and submit my glory in exchange for your glory.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2020 in 2 Peter

 

The Elephant

Dear God, I’ve been praying through and thinking through these scriptures all week. I’ve looked at Moses on the mountain getting about eight chapters worth of instructions from you. I’ve looked at Peter talking in his second epistle about his experience at the Transfiguration. And I’ve looked at the Transfiguration itself. I’ve also layered on top of it the story of Naomi from the book of Ruth. These are the pieces of quilt I feel like you’ve given to me this week as I’ve prepared to preach tomorrow. So this morning, what I’d like to do is ask you to help me take these pieces and weave them together into the message that your Holy Spirit wants to deliver to the parishioners at the local Presbyterian church in the morning .

It starts, I think, with the old illustration of the blind men who each touch a different part of an elephant and then asked to describe the elephant. One describes the elephant as being a really long stump (the leg). One describe an elephant as an odd snake-type creature or really long, rough hose (the trunk). One describes it as a long smooth spear (the tusk). One describes it as a huge rough wall (the body). Another describes it as a thin, wiggly animal with some hair on the end (the tail). They are all accurate in their description of what they know, but they are wrong. They can’t see what we can see. They cannot see how the leg, trunk, tusk, body, and tail all work together to form one of the most majestic animals in the world.

That’s what you showed me in the story of Moses on the mountain. You were getting some business done with Moses. It was housekeeping time. It was paperwork time. You and Moses needed to spend some time together so that you could give him some marching orders for all of Israel. But the Israelites couldn’t see what was going on. All they saw was the cloud and the fire. For all they knew, you had grown angry with Moses and he was dead. If you would have asked them to explain what was going on they would have had no clue. Not even Moses really understood the whole picture, but you did. You could see what no one else could see.

Then we get the story of the Transfiguration. Another example of you tangibly showing up on a mountain and spending some time with your man. In this case, it was your son, Jesus, and he brought three friends (notably, you brought two friends of your own in Moses and Elijah). You know I’ve thought for a number of years that you did this because Jesus needed it. He was on his way to Jerusalem. He, at a minimum, had a good idea of what was coming if not complete knowledge of his impending future. I think he needed some affirmation and encouragement, and you provided it to him through your personal presence and affirmation as well as whatever he learned from Moses and Elijah. But what were Peter, John, and James doing there? If you asked them in that moment to describe what they had just experienced they would have said that Jesus is really powerful, and they had just gotten to see Moses and Elijah. Yes, Jesus kept talking about his death, but they didn’t really believe that. How could he possibly die? It’s almost like we look at the current stock market. How could it possibly start to lose? The piece of the elephant they could see what very small in the grand scheme of things. They didn’t understand the pressure Jesus was under or what he needed. They didn’t understand what you were doing for them in revealing the reality of Jesus being the Messiah to them through this story. That’s what the verses in 2 Peter are about. Peter, in retrospect, is telling his audience that he knows the Jesus story is real because of what he witnessed on that mountain. He and his two friends didn’t only hear some disembodied voice that could be explained away as a hallucination. They physically saw Elijah and Moses–so much so that it occurred to Peter to put up houses for them. You don’t build houses for spirits.

And then on the way down, they are still trying to make sense of what they had seen. They wondered if maybe seeing Elijah there was a fulfillment of the prophecy about Elijah preceding the Messiah. That’s when Jesus explains to them that they have already seen Elijah in John the Baptist. Jesus showed them just a little more of the elephant.

So why don’t you show us what is going on? Why do you keep us on a need-to-know basis? Why is it that I so rarely need to know? The answer is obvious. If we know any suffering or inconvenience that lies ahead we will most certainly avoid it. If I had known what answering your call to quit my stable job in 2003 would mean to my own discomfort and instability I might not have done it. If I had known some of the pain involved in parenting I might have avoided it. If Jacob had known that his relocation to Egypt would result in generations of slavery he might have let his family die in the desert. And that impoverished widow who Jesus saw put her two coins in the collection never knew that her faithfulness in the midst of her poverty would be a lesson to all of us for thousands of years.

And then there is Naomi. She was convinced you had turned on her. Mara. Call me Mara because God has made my life bitter. When I left I had everything, but now He has taken everything from me. The Lord has sent me nothing but tragedy and made me suffer. (Ruth 1:20-21) But she didn’t know. She didn’t know that you would use her situation and the loss of her husband and sons to bring Ruth to Bethlehem. She didn’t know that she would play a role, through her dead husband’s legacy, in setting Ruth up with Boaz. And she didn’t know that she would end up cuddling and raising King David’s grandfather, Obed. She didn’t know that Obed’s grandchild would kill Goliath and set up the country for its greatest period. She could only see a little piece of the elephant. But you were faithful to her.

What’s one other common thread in these stories. You gave each person affirmations along the way. They didn’t necessarily see them as affirmations. The Israelites didn’t understand that if Moses had just disappeared for 40 days with no cloud or fire they wouldn’t have necessarily believed him when he came back with the rules. Peter didn’t realize at the time that you had given him evidence of who Jesus was through witnessing the Transfiguration. And Naomi didn’t see it at the time, but if she had stopped feeling sorry for herself for a moment she would have seen that Ruth was there for her when she absolutely didn’t have to be. Naomi could have been left for dead, but you were there for her.

Father, help me to reach the level of faith where I don’t need to see what the elephant looks like to follow you joyfully. I don’t know what the lives of my children will look like. I can’t see how a decision they make in this moment will impact the next. I cannot see how my own actions will flow into history. But you have been good to me. You have been better to me than I deserve. I guess my simplest prayer is that I will decrease, you will increase, and I will worship you and do my best to love all of those around me with your love.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
 

2 Peter 1:16-21

For we were not making up clever stories when we told you about the powerful coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. We saw his majestic splendor with our own eyes when he received honor and glory from God the Father. The voice from the majestic glory of God said to him, “This is my dearly loved Son, who brings me great joy.” We ourselves heard that voice from heaven when we were with him on the holy mountain. Because of that experience, we have even greater confidence in the message proclaimed by the prophets. You must pay close attention to what they wrote, for their words are like a lamp shining in a dark place—until the Day dawns, and Christ the Morning Star shines in your hearts. Above all, you must realize that no prophecy in Scripture ever came from the prophet’s own understanding, or from human initiative. No, those prophets were moved by the Holy Spirit, and they spoke from God.
2 Peter 1:16-21

Dear God, this New Testament reading for this Sunday fits in with the gospel reading (transfiguration) and the Old Testament reading I prayed about a couple of days ago with Moses going up on the mountain. Moses and Jesus has their personal encounters with you, but so did Joshua, Peter, James and John. It’s important not to overlook the impact your personal presence on these two mountains had on everyone involved.

In the case of this passage, Peter is leaning on it as evidence. It’s like he’s saying. “You can’t tell me this whole Jesus guy was a fraud because I saw Moses and Elijah, I felt the Holy Spirit and I heard God. I was there. It was real. It is real.”

So now one might question Peter’s testimony–or John’s or anyone else’s. Well, if they were lying then they were fools because all their lying brought them was suffering and, in most cases, martyrdom. Not much of a reward for lying.

I wonder if you have appeared to anyone in such a personal, tangible way in the last 2,000 years. I know many claim to have heard your voice. For my part, I have certainly felt lead by the Holy Spirit and felt words placed on my heart that seemed to be from you. I’ve also had people say things to me that the Holy Spirit seemed to encourage me to heed as words from you.

Father, as I try to crystallize your message to the church this weekend through my sermon, please speak to me. Guide me so that I might be your voice for at least one person in that room this weekend. Love through me. Encourage and admonish through me. Inspire through me. And help me to decrease as you increase.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on February 18, 2020 in 2 Peter

 

2 Peter 3:8-9

But you must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent.
2 Peter 3:8-9

Dear God, I’m learning more and more to wait on your timing. 32 years of experience with being a discipling Christian helps. Interestingly, as I look back, it feels like the first 25 years of that time set up my ability to learn the lesson over the last seven years. It was actually right at 10 years ago that things started to get harder than I knew what to do with. Then it was the next eight or so years of a valley that helped me to see beyond myself. I know there are more difficult circumstances and that the refining fire can be hotter than what I experienced. I’m just saying that it was as deep of a dark time as I’ve been through in my life and, in retrospect, I can say one of the things you taught me is that you are doing things I cannot see (and I might never see), but I need to trust that you are working all things for your best for the world, me, and those I love. I also need to understand that there is only so much you can do when dealing with the free will you grant us all.

So as I look around my life today, are there any areas where I’m being impatient with you? The good news, I think, is that I complain a lot less in my private prayers to you (but I confess I do still complain). The study I did of Job and then Paul, with Job’s learning that his life is yours and giving it to you without complaint is his duty, and Paul living out that principle by never complaining about his lot in life as he’s in prison, but “counting it all joy” instead, really helped me.

Father, what I’ve said this morning sounds arrogant and foolish. Please hear that I don’t think I’ve arrived. What I want to do is take these lessons I’ve learned and continuously apply them to my life so that I might be 1.) the best worshipper of you that I can be and 2.) living in the peace you have for me. Help me to be your ambassador, and, as I’ve prayed a lot lately, to be a catalyst for your kingdom coming and your will being done on Earth as it is in Heaven.

In Jesus’s name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2019 in 2 Peter

 

Peter & John — 2 Peter 3:11-18

2 Peter 3:11-18 NIV
[11] Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be? You ought to live holy and godly lives [12] as you look forward to the day of God and speed its coming. That day will bring about the destruction of the heavens by fire, and the elements will melt in the heat. [13] But in keeping with his promise we are looking forward to a new heaven and a new earth, where righteousness dwells. [14] So then, dear friends, since you are looking forward to this, make every effort to be found spotless, blameless and at peace with him. [15] Bear in mind that our Lord’s patience means salvation, just as our dear brother Paul also wrote you with the wisdom that God gave him. [16] He writes the same way in all his letters, speaking in them of these matters. His letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures, to their own destruction. [17] Therefore, dear friends, since you have been forewarned, be on your guard so that you may not be carried away by the error of the lawless and fall from your secure position. [18] But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and forever! Amen.

Dear God, the reference to Paul here caught me off guard. I had forgotten that was there. I wonder what Peter and Paul thought of each other. I get the feeling that Paul was a little more cerebral than Peter was, and that kind of comes through in Peter’s comment in verse 16: “His letters contain some things which are hard to understand.” I wonder if Peter on one level appreciated Pauls depth and insights, and on the other hand thought he might overthink things a little.

As for the thesis of this chapter, it seems to be to be careful of false teachers and keep yourself pure. It reminds me of something I heard the Christian singer, Rich Mullins, say back in the 90s: “The world’s going to go the way the world’s going to go. So keep yourself pure and love everyone you can.”

Last weekend, I was praying through something and the word I got from you was that the answer was love, love, love, and love. This situation is tricky and it would be easy to get in my trench and just try to both defend myself and shell the other side. But what if, instead, I just showed love that is selfless and ultimately blameless? Isn’t that part of what you are calling me to do? Isn’t that basically what Peter is saying here?

Father, help me to worship you well and to let that flow through me. I visited with a friend yesterday who is struggling. I kind of presented your Gospel to her, but I felt very inadequate to do it. I don’t know if I was effective or not. But please use what I said for your glory in her life. Please give her the freedom, the peace, the hope, and the joy that you have for her through repentance and relationship. Show me the role I have to play in her life, and raise up a good woman who can also be your person for her.

In Jesus’ name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2019 in 2 Peter, Peter and John

 

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Peter & John — 2 Peter 3:1-13

2 Peter 3:1-13 NIV
[1] Dear friends, this is now my second letter to you. I have written both of them as reminders to stimulate you to wholesome thinking. [2] I want you to recall the words spoken in the past by the holy prophets and the command given by our Lord and Savior through your apostles. [3] Above all, you must understand that in the last days scoffers will come, scoffing and following their own evil desires. [4] They will say, “Where is this ‘coming’ he promised? Ever since our ancestors died, everything goes on as it has since the beginning of creation.” [5] But they deliberately forget that long ago by God’s word the heavens came into being and the earth was formed out of water and by water. [6] By these waters also the world of that time was deluged and destroyed. [7] By the same word the present heavens and earth are reserved for fire, being kept for the day of judgment and destruction of the ungodly. [8] But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. [9] The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance. [10] But the day of the Lord will come like a thief. The heavens will disappear with a roar; the elements will be destroyed by fire, and the earth and everything done in it will be laid bare. [11] Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be? You ought to live holy and godly lives [12] as you look forward to the day of God and speed its coming. That day will bring about the destruction of the heavens by fire, and the elements will melt in the heat. [13] But in keeping with his promise we are looking forward to a new heaven and a new earth, where righteousness dwells.

Dear God, I was thinking recently about the accumulation of wealth and striving for retirement. In fact, a friend and I were talking yesterday about when enough will be enough. He is wanting to go into nonprofit work, but feels like he has to first get his kids all of the way through college and then have his retirement planned before he can do that. He was looking at being a minimum of 15 years away from that.

As for me, when I first took the job I currently have at a nonprofit I was in my mid-30s and in no way expected it to be my last job. I figured I would get my daughter (she was six at the time) through high school so she wouldn’t have to move and then move on. Well, my daughter stopped going to school in our town almost five years ago and here I am still at this job. I told the friend yesterday that a few years ago I actually started to get my head into a space where this could actually be my last job. I’ve been there 13 years now. I know that if you are willing I have at least 20 more years of being able to work productively. Will I really look back and say that I worked for this nonprofit for over 30 years?

The questions that start to come to me out of this thought are interesting. The first is, how am I going to start accumulating more for retirement? Nonprofits, by nature, don’t pay at a level that will allow me to stick a lot away into an IRA. Should I take a second job driving for wine tours on weekends to prepare for that day?

Then there is achievement. When I was fresh out of college I had dreams of doing great things. “Great” was undefined, but I am pretty sure working for a nonprofit in a rural community wouldn’t have registered in my top 10 at the time.

Spiritually, I had a dream to influence hundreds or thousands of people (or tens of thousands or millions) towards believing in and pursuing you. My first job out of college was working for a Christian music publisher. At that point, I thought I would end up in Nashville and eventually run the label and distribution company. I remember privately working on projects that would build Bible studies out of musical albums. Even some of the writing I have done over the years might have caught on and influenced a lot of people. But that hasn’t really happened.

Father, I leave all of that hubris and ego at the foot of your cross. I leave the fear of scarcity and the lethargy of desiring retirement and comfort at the foot of your cross. I leave the preoccupation of my future (which is completely unknown to all but you) at the foot of the cross. All I have is today as I await your return. I have the work you have put in front of me to do today. That includes how you want me to love my family, reach out to others, and then do the paid and unpaid tasks that you have put in front of me to do. Help me to do it all with your peace, your strength, and for your glory and not mine.

In Jesus’ name I pray,

Amen

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2019 in 2 Peter, Peter and John

 

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