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Emails to God – Driven to Prayer (Esther 8)

08 Jul

That same day King Xerxes gave Queen Esther the estate of Haman, the enemy of the Jews. And Mordecai came into the presence of the king, for Esther had told how he was related to her. 2 The king took off his signet ring, which he had reclaimed from Haman, and presented it to Mordecai. And Esther appointed him over Haman’s estate.

3 Esther again pleaded with the king, falling at his feet and weeping. She begged him to put an end to the evil plan of Haman the Agagite, which he had devised against the Jews. 4 Then the king extended the gold scepter to Esther and she arose and stood before him.

5 “If it pleases the king,” she said, “and if he regards me with favor and thinks it the right thing to do, and if he is pleased with me, let an order be written overruling the dispatches that Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, devised and wrote to destroy the Jews in all the king’s provinces. 6 For how can I bear to see disaster fall on my people? How can I bear to see the destruction of my family?”

7 King Xerxes replied to Queen Esther and to Mordecai the Jew, “Because Haman attacked the Jews, I have given his estate to Esther, and they have impaled him on the pole he set up. 8 Now write another decree in the king’s name in behalf of the Jews as seems best to you, and seal it with the king’s signet ring —for no document written in the king’s name and sealed with his ring can be revoked.”

9 At once the royal secretaries were summoned—on the twenty-third day of the third month, the month of Sivan. They wrote out all Mordecai’s orders to the Jews, and to the satraps, governors and nobles of the 127 provinces stretching from India to Cush. These orders were written in the script of each province and the language of each people and also to the Jews in their own script and language. 10 Mordecai wrote in the name of King Xerxes, sealed the dispatches with the king’s signet ring, and sent them by mounted couriers, who rode fast horses especially bred for the king.

11 The king’s edict granted the Jews in every city the right to assemble and protect themselves; to destroy, kill and annihilate the armed men of any nationality or province who might attack them and their women and children, and to plunder the property of their enemies. 12 The day appointed for the Jews to do this in all the provinces of King Xerxes was the thirteenth day of the twelfth month, the month of Adar. 13 A copy of the text of the edict was to be issued as law in every province and made known to the people of every nationality so that the Jews would be ready on that day to avenge themselves on their enemies.

14 The couriers, riding the royal horses, went out, spurred on by the king’s command, and the edict was issued in the citadel of Susa.

15 When Mordecai left the king’s presence, he was wearing royal garments of blue and white, a large crown of gold and a purple robe of fine linen. And the city of Susa held a joyous celebration. 16 For the Jews it was a time of happiness and joy, gladness and honor. 17 In every province and in every city to which the edict of the king came, there was joy and gladness among the Jews, with feasting and celebrating. And many people of other nationalities became Jews because fear of the Jews had seized them.

Dear God, I think it is interesting that, by the end of this saga, many people became Jews. Through this potential tragedy you pressed people, strengthened their faith, and even brought new believers into the fold.

 

Isn’t that the way it always is? We see tragedy coming at us and it draws us into you. I am almost never drawn to you during my good times. I am drawn to you when I need you. In fact, I am here right now praying to you through this journal because I have a talk to give this morning and I want to make sure I am prayed up and rightly related to you before I give it. If I were just having a normal morning then I might have gone to church and then sat down to watch a little Wimbledon or the Tour de France. But I need you and I am here praying to you.

 

Father, forgive me for my lethargy. Forgive me that it takes anything but my love and devotion to you to bring me into relationship and fellowship with you. Thank you that you are continuously calling me. Thank you that you are here when I repent. I am truly sorry for the pain that I cause you. As a father, I know what it is like to be occasionally rejected by my children, only to be loved again when I am needed. I know at least a small bit of that pain. So I thank you for your love and ask that you will speak through me today as I represent you to a group of people who need a touch of you, as we all do.

 

 
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Posted by on July 8, 2012 in Esther

 

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